DOWLING ONE NAME STUDY

Person Page 44

Elijah Dowling

M, #1076, b. 1778, d. 16 August 1816

Parents

Pedigree Link

Family

Family:

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Birth: Elijah Dowling was born in 1778.
  • Death: He died on 16 August 1816, at age ~38, in Barnwell, South Carolina, USAG.

Other Facts

  • Will: Elijah Dowling left a will in Barnville, South Carolina, USA.1
  • Reference Number: He had reference number 1076.

Narrative


DFS Notes: William Dowling was probably born before 1756 (much to late if father remarried in 1754!) VA Mother's name unknown. He died. c. 1782 . Wm. in SC by Summer 1770 (Two years before father Robert came there) SC Land Grant to William in 1771 - 60 acres on Flat Creek in Craven Co. (Adjoining owners William Breton and a widow Gibson) Paid King's 'quit Rent' in Jan. 1774 in area now part of Darlington County. 1775 moved 100 mi SW to Orangeberg District and purchased a 100 acre tract on the Little Salkehatchee at Cyprus Pond from one Thomas Ford. Near present-day Bamberg, SC. Fought with Francis 'Swampfox' Marion at hopeless defense of Charleston and afterwards. Died about 1782 (age about 26+?) Caught at home in 1780's by Tories and shot dead while young (12 year-old!?? son Jabez watched.2

Children of William2 Dowling and Rebecca Walker were as follows:

i. Jabez3; b. between Mar 1770 and Aug 1770 in South Carolina; Jabez, the oldest son of an oldest son, was born in 1770 between March and August. Rebecca gave birth to him in South Carolina. He was carried to the Little Salkchatchee area as a child.2
ii. Elijah; b. 1778 in South Carolina; m. Elizabeth Rice, daughter of Aaron Rice Sr. and Elender Rhoden, circa 1796; Elijah Dowling was married by the time he was eighteen.2
iii. Cageby; m. Sarah (--?--);2 b. circa 1780.2

Taken from Website: http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/walter_wood/waltsweb/genehome.htm
17 April 1999
please contact me by e-mail at walter_wood@compuserve.com
-------------------------------------------Re: Robert Dowling b. 1730 - Descendents
Posted by kathy king belknap on February 20, 1999 at 13:02:55:
E-mail: belknap@netside.com
In Reply to: Re: Robert Dowling b. 1730 - Descendents posted by Kelly M. Roberson on October 29, 1998 at 16:22:44:

My Dowling line is from Robert to William to Elijah to daugh. Eleanor who married John Hanberry.

We have no pictures of Eleanor Dowling Hanberry or her husband John. If anyone has a picture of either of them, I would be happy to pay the cost of copying and mailing.

My grandfather Hanberry was the one who participated in the yellow fever experiment.

Any help with pictures (or any other info on Eleanor Dowling Hanberry would be greatly appreciated.
-------------
From: CHanberry@aol.com [mailto:CHanberry@aol.com]
Sent: 23 May 1999 02:49
To: IRELAND-L@rootsweb.com
Subject: Dowling/Hanberry/Conniffe

Hi List,
I believe my Dowling line originated in Ireland, but I don't know where to
look for them there. It could be the Galway area. My earliest Dowling was
Robert born about 1704 probably in Ireland and then he probably emigrated to
Virginia. He married (unknown) and they had a son Robert who was born in
Agusta County, Virginia. This Robert had three sons, Jabez, Elijah and
Cageby. Elijah, my ggg grandfather, married Elizabeth Rice and their
daughter Eleanor was my gg grandmother and she married John Hanberry in South
Carolina. If anyone is familiar with these Dowlings please contact me.

Thanks

Chuck Hanberry

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Re: Robert Dowling b. 1730 - Descendents
Posted by kathy king belknap on February 20, 1999 at 13:02:55:
E-mail: belknap@netside.com
In Reply to: Re: Robert Dowling b. 1730 - Descendents posted by Kelly M. Roberson on October 29, 1998 at 16:22:44:

My Dowling line is from Robert to William to Elijah to daugh. Eleanor who married John Hanberry.

We have no pictures of Eleanor Dowling Hanberry or her husband John. If anyone has a picture of either of them, I would be happy to pay the cost of copying and mailing.

My grandfather Hanberry was the one who participated in the yellow fever experiment.

Any help with pictures (or any other info on Eleanor Dowling Hanberry would be greatly appreciated.

md:abt 1796 in Salkehatchee area, Barnwell Dist.?, S.C., to Elizabet h RICE

md:abt 1796 in Salkehatchee area, Barnwell Dist.?, S.C., to Elizabet h RICE

-----------------------------------------------
"Elijah Dowlings will is on file in Barnville court house, SC it contains the following clause ..."lastly to Decanie, my oldest son, I give tinder box and powder horn which my father william dowling used in the war with General Marion, the War of American Independance." - Dee Cryer 2011 (dcryer@cfl.rr.com.)

Citations

  1. [S667] SOURCE: (Full):
    Source Combined Fields: Dowling.

    First Contact: 21 Jan 2011

Robert Dowling

M, #1077, d. DECEASED
Pedigree Link

Family

Family: Eva Morris (b. 12 October 1877, d. September 1971)

  • Robert Dowling+
  • Richard? Dowling
  • Eva Dowling

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Death: Robert Dowling died DECEASED.

Other Facts

  • Name: Robert Dowling was also known as Joe Dowling.
  • Reference Number: He had reference number 1077.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

DOWLING/MORRIS; NY; 1890-now
Posted by Morris Ryan on December 04, 1998 at 15:38:38:

Eva MORRIS (an Irish immigrant[1892]) married a Robert DOWLING and settled in the New England area. Her last known mailing address was in a town called Far Rockaway, New York. At one time they lived in New Rochelle, New York, and believe these cites are closely situated. They had at least two sons and one daughter: Robert DOWLING, Jr., was a very successful business man and at one time was president or chairman of the Peabody Company; The second some became a Catholic priest and I believe his name was Richard - At any rate he was an Army Chaplin and was captured by the Japanese with the fall of the Philippines in World War II. He survived the death march of Battan.; The daughter was also named Eva. Nothing more is known about this Eva.

Any help at all much appreciated.

Morris Ryan
Spokane, WA
-----Original Message-----
From: Morris Ryan [mailto:mgryan@earthlink.net]
Sent: 28 September 1999 21:15
To: DOWLING-L@rootsweb.com
Subject: DOWLING NY, late 1800s to present

Would like to exchange information with anyone interested in the following
Dowling familys.

My Uncle provided the following description of the Dowling family when he
wrote from memory our family history:

Eva Morris married a Robert Dowling and settled in the New England area.
Her last known address was in a town called Far Away Rockaway, New York. At
one time they lived in New Rochelle, New York, and believe these cites are
closely situated. They had at least two sons and one daughter. Robert
Dowling, Jr., was a very successful business man and at one time was
president or chairman of the Peabody Company. This company made Arrow shirts
among other things. The second some became a Catholic priest and I believe
his name was Richard. At any rate he was an Army Chaplin and was captured
by the Japanese with the fall of the Philippines in World War II. He
survived the death march of Bataan and I read somewhere of his being cited
for bravery. The daughter was also named Eva. Nothing more is known about
this Eva.
------------------------------------
Another description of this same Dowling family can be found at:
http://www.compapp.dcu.ie/~humphrys/FamTree/ORahilly/dowling.html

Joe Dowling [or possibly "Robert"],
engineer for New York state, at Ellis Island (the nation's major immigration
point), upper New York Bay,
engineer in New York port,
mar Eva Morris [born 12th Oct 1877],
they lived in house on Devil's Island, across the river,
lived Far Rockaway (think nr New Rochelle), NY,
Eva died Sept 1971, New Rochelle, NY, age 94 yrs,
having had issue:

Bob Dowling, mar Evelyn ---- and had issue:

Richard Dowling, mar Janet ---- and had issue:
Suzanne Dowling.
Elissa Dowling.
Kathleen Dowling, mar --- Smith and had issue:
Kevin Smith.

John Dowling, mar Ann Chisulm and had issue:
John Dowling, mar Aebe Sanders.
Peter Dowling, mar Denise ----.
Roderick Dowling, mar Marianne Maloney.
Brian Dowling.
Robert Dowling.

Richard Dowling.

Mag Dowling [or possibly "Eva"],
mar Robert ---- and had issue:
Abigail ----.
Kathleen ----, mar P. Dur.
Shawn ----.
Brendan ----.
Robert Emmet ----.

Morris Ryan
Spokane, WA.

Eva Morris

F, #1078, b. 12 October 1877, d. September 1971
Pedigree Link

Families

Family 1: Robert Dowling (d. DECEASED)

  • Eva Dowling

Family 2: Robert Dowling (d. DECEASED)

  • Robert Dowling+
  • Richard? Dowling
  • Eva Dowling

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Birth: Eva Morris was born on 12 October 1877 in Ireland.
  • Death: She died in September 1971, at age 93, in New Rochelle, Westchester, New York, USAG.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: Eva Morris had reference number 1078.
  • Emigration: She emigrated from USA in 1892 from Ireland.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

DOWLING/MORRIS; NY; 1890-now
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Posted by Morris Ryan on December 04, 1998 at 15:38:38:

Eva MORRIS (an Irish immigrant[1892]) married a Robert DOWLING and settled in the New England area. Her last known mailing address was in a town called Far Rockaway, New York. At one time they lived in New Rochelle, New York, and believe these cites are closely situated. They had at least two sons and one daughter: Robert DOWLING, Jr., was a very successful business man and at one time was president or chairman of the Peabody Company; The second some became a Catholic priest and I believe his name was Richard - At any rate he was an Army Chaplin and was captured by the Japanese with the fall of the Philippines in World War II. He survived the death march of Battan.; The daughter was also named Eva. Nothing more is known about this Eva.

Any help at all much appreciated.

Morris Ryan
Spokane, WA

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

DOWLING/MORRIS; NY; 1890-now
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Posted by Morris Ryan on December 04, 1998 at 15:38:38:

Eva MORRIS (an Irish immigrant[1892]) married a Robert DOWLING and settled in the New England area. Her last known mailing address was in a town called Far Rockaway, New York. At one time they lived in New Rochelle, New York, and believe these cites are closely situated. They had at least two sons and one daughter: Robert DOWLING, Jr., was a very successful business man and at one time was president or chairman of the Peabody Company; The second some became a Catholic priest and I believe his name was Richard - At any rate he was an Army Chaplin and was captured by the Japanese with the fall of the Philippines in World War II. He survived the death march of Battan.; The daughter was also named Eva. Nothing more is known about this Eva.

Any help at all much appreciated.

Morris Ryan
Spokane, WA

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

DOWLING/MORRIS; NY; 1890-now
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Posted by Morris Ryan on December 04, 1998 at 15:38:38:

Eva MORRIS (an Irish immigrant[1892]) married a Robert DOWLING and settled in the New England area. Her last known mailing address was in a town called Far Rockaway, New York. At one time they lived in New Rochelle, New York, and believe these cites are closely situated. They had at least two sons and one daughter: Robert DOWLING, Jr., was a very successful business man and at one time was president or chairman of the Peabody Company; The second some became a Catholic priest and I believe his name was Richard - At any rate he was an Army Chaplin and was captured by the Japanese with the fall of the Philippines in World War II. He survived the death march of Battan.; The daughter was also named Eva. Nothing more is known about this Eva.

Any help at all much appreciated.

Morris Ryan
Spokane, WA.

Phoebe Ann Dowling

F, #1082, b. 22 February 1834, d. 27 January 1912

Parents

Pedigree Link

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Birth: Phoebe Ann Dowling was born on 22 February 1834.
  • Marriage: She and Benjamin Thomas Potter were married on 4 February 1858 in Marshalltown, Digby, Nova Scotia, Canada.
  • Death: She died on 27 January 1912, at age 77.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: Phoebe Ann Dowling had reference number 1082.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Dowling in N.Scotia & Boston
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Posted by Louise Morell on December 12, 1998 at 05:51:14:

My gr grandmother was Phoebe Ann Dowling, b 2/22/1834, married Benjamin Thomas Potter on 2/4/1858 in Marshalltown,Digby,NS. They had 8 children. Moved to Page, ND in 1882 and to Idaho in 1906. She died 1/27/1912 and is buried in Mt. Home ID. Parents: Alexander Dowling and Nancy McIntire. She had a brother, Jacob (or Jackson) Dowling of Boston and family lore says they had a sister who was Thomas Edison's mother??? Said to be Scots but may be from McIntire line. I have no further info on this family.

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Dowling in N.Scotia & Boston
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Posted by Louise Morell on December 12, 1998 at 05:51:14:

My gr grandmother was Phoebe Ann Dowling, b 2/22/1834, married Benjamin Thomas Potter on 2/4/1858 in Marshalltown,Digby,NS. They had 8 children. Moved to Page, ND in 1882 and to Idaho in 1906. She died 1/27/1912 and is buried in Mt. Home ID. Parents: Alexander Dowling and Nancy McIntire. She had a brother, Jacob (or Jackson) Dowling of Boston and family lore says they had a sister who was Thomas Edison's mother??? Said to be Scots but may be from McIntire line. I have no further info on this family.

Benjamin Thomas Potter

M, #1083, d. DECEASED
Pedigree Link

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Marriage: Benjamin Thomas Potter and Phoebe Ann Dowling were married on 4 February 1858 in Marshalltown, Digby, Nova Scotia, Canada.
  • Death: He died DECEASED.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: Benjamin Thomas Potter had reference number 1083.

Alexander Dowling

M, #1084, d. DECEASED
Pedigree Link

Family

Family: Nancy McIntire (d. DECEASED)

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Death: Alexander Dowling died DECEASED.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: Alexander Dowling had reference number 1084.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Dowling in N.Scotia & Boston
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Posted by Louise Morell on December 12, 1998 at 05:51:14:

My gr grandmother was Phoebe Ann Dowling, b 2/22/1834, married Benjamin Thomas Potter on 2/4/1858 in Marshalltown,Digby,NS. They had 8 children. Moved to Page, ND in 1882 and to Idaho in 1906. She died 1/27/1912 and is buried in Mt. Home ID. Parents: Alexander Dowling and Nancy McIntire. She had a brother, Jacob (or Jackson) Dowling of Boston and family lore says they had a sister who was Thomas Edison's mother??? Said to be Scots but may be from McIntire line. I have no further info on this family.

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Dowling in N.Scotia & Boston
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Posted by Louise Morell on December 12, 1998 at 05:51:14:

My gr grandmother was Phoebe Ann Dowling, b 2/22/1834, married Benjamin Thomas Potter on 2/4/1858 in Marshalltown,Digby,NS. They had 8 children. Moved to Page, ND in 1882 and to Idaho in 1906. She died 1/27/1912 and is buried in Mt. Home ID. Parents: Alexander Dowling and Nancy McIntire. She had a brother, Jacob (or Jackson) Dowling of Boston and family lore says they had a sister who was Thomas Edison's mother??? Said to be Scots but may be from McIntire line. I have no further info on this family.

Nancy McIntire

F, #1085, d. DECEASED
Pedigree Link

Family

Family: Alexander Dowling (d. DECEASED)

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Death: Nancy McIntire died DECEASED.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: Nancy McIntire had reference number 1085.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Dowling in N.Scotia & Boston
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Posted by Louise Morell on December 12, 1998 at 05:51:14:

My gr grandmother was Phoebe Ann Dowling, b 2/22/1834, married Benjamin Thomas Potter on 2/4/1858 in Marshalltown,Digby,NS. They had 8 children. Moved to Page, ND in 1882 and to Idaho in 1906. She died 1/27/1912 and is buried in Mt. Home ID. Parents: Alexander Dowling and Nancy McIntire. She had a brother, Jacob (or Jackson) Dowling of Boston and family lore says they had a sister who was Thomas Edison's mother??? Said to be Scots but may be from McIntire line. I have no further info on this family.

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Dowling in N.Scotia & Boston
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Posted by Louise Morell on December 12, 1998 at 05:51:14:

My gr grandmother was Phoebe Ann Dowling, b 2/22/1834, married Benjamin Thomas Potter on 2/4/1858 in Marshalltown,Digby,NS. They had 8 children. Moved to Page, ND in 1882 and to Idaho in 1906. She died 1/27/1912 and is buried in Mt. Home ID. Parents: Alexander Dowling and Nancy McIntire. She had a brother, Jacob (or Jackson) Dowling of Boston and family lore says they had a sister who was Thomas Edison's mother??? Said to be Scots but may be from McIntire line. I have no further info on this family.

Jacob or Jackson Dowling

M, #1086, d. DECEASED

Parents

Pedigree Link

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Death: Jacob or Jackson Dowling died DECEASED.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: Jacob or Jackson Dowling had reference number 1086.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Dowling in N.Scotia & Boston
[ Follow Ups ] [ Post Followup ] [ Return to Message Listings ] [ Help ]

Posted by Louise Morell on December 12, 1998 at 05:51:14:

My gr grandmother was Phoebe Ann Dowling, b 2/22/1834, married Benjamin Thomas Potter on 2/4/1858 in Marshalltown,Digby,NS. They had 8 children. Moved to Page, ND in 1882 and to Idaho in 1906. She died 1/27/1912 and is buried in Mt. Home ID. Parents: Alexander Dowling and Nancy McIntire. She had a brother, Jacob (or Jackson) Dowling of Boston and family lore says they had a sister who was Thomas Edison's mother??? Said to be Scots but may be from McIntire line. I have no further info on this family.

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Dowling in N.Scotia & Boston
[ Follow Ups ] [ Post Followup ] [ Return to Message Listings ] [ Help ]

Posted by Louise Morell on December 12, 1998 at 05:51:14:

My gr grandmother was Phoebe Ann Dowling, b 2/22/1834, married Benjamin Thomas Potter on 2/4/1858 in Marshalltown,Digby,NS. They had 8 children. Moved to Page, ND in 1882 and to Idaho in 1906. She died 1/27/1912 and is buried in Mt. Home ID. Parents: Alexander Dowling and Nancy McIntire. She had a brother, Jacob (or Jackson) Dowling of Boston and family lore says they had a sister who was Thomas Edison's mother??? Said to be Scots but may be from McIntire line. I have no further info on this family.

Dowling

M, #1088, d. DECEASED

Parents

Pedigree Link

Family

Family:

  • David Dowling

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Death: Dowling died DECEASED.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: Dowling had reference number 1088.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

Re: Dowlings in England
Posted by Dave Dowling on December 27, 1998 at 14:20:42:

In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Alison Rosser on April 05, 1998 at 15:02:07:

Re Wok'ham area? My g/father was a Sydney Dowling born c1900,resided Horley, Surrey. Sons Peter/John. Tie in anywhere?
----------------------------------------
Re: Dowlings in England
Posted by Dave Dowling on December 28, 1998 at 01:34:12:

In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Dave Dowling on December 27, 1998 at 14:20:42:

Corr. to earlier note. Place of domicile in
1920/30's was Hawley not Horley.

Sydney William Dowling1,2

M, #1089, b. 6 February 1897, d. DECEASED

Parents

Pedigree Link

Family

Family:

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Birth: Sydney William Dowling was born on 6 February 1897 in Binfield, Easthampstead, Berkshire, England.1,3,4
  • Death: He died DECEASED.

Other Facts

  • Name: Sydney William Dowling was also known as Sidney Dowling.3,4
  • Reference Number: He had reference number 1089.
  • Residence: He resided in Binfield, Easthampstead, Berkshire, England, on 31 March 1901 The Manse.4
  • Census: He was enumerated on the census of 1901 in Binfield, Easthampstead, Berkshire, England.4
  • Census: He was enumerated on the census of 1911 in Frimley, Surrey, England.3
  • Occupation: He was an Errand Boy in Frimley, Surrey, England, on 2 April 1911.3
  • Residence: He resided in Frimley, Surrey, England, on 2 April 1911 1 Spring Cottage, York Town.3
  • Residence: He resided between 1920 and 1930 Hawley.1

Citations

  1. [S1358] SOURCE: (Full):
    Source Combined Fields: Dowlings in England, discussion list, 1998. Rootsweb : 1998.,
    Citation Detail: Re: Dowlings in EnglandPosted by Dave Dowling on December 27, 1998 at 14:20:42:In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Alison Rosser on April 05, 1998 at 15:02:07:Re Wok'ham area? My g/father was a Sydney Dowling born c1900,resided Horley, Surrey. Sons Peter/John. Tie in anywhere?
    Citation Text: -----------------------------
    Re: Dowlings in England
    Posted by Dave Dowling on December 28, 1998 at 01:34:12:
    In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Dave Dowling on December 27, 1998 at 14:20:42:

    Corr. to earlier note. Place of domicile in 1920/30's was Hawley not Horley.
    -------------------------
    Re: Dowlings in England
    Posted by Dave Dowling on January 23, 1999 at 12:56:27:

    In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Alison Rosser on January 10, 1999 at 13:14:37:

    Haven't had much joy as yet. The only further info. I can add is that my ggfather full name was Sydney William Dowling and was born 6/2/97 and that his father's first name was William.
    --------------------
    Re: Dowlings in England
    Posted by Dave Dowling on March 20, 1999 at 14:24:38:

    In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Dave Dowling on January 23, 1999 at 12:56:27:

    I now know my grandfather [Sydney William] was born 6/2/1897 in Binfield [although record office has it as Easthampstead but these are probably one of the same]. His father was I believe a William and I am awaiting clarification on this. I see from the 1881 Census that there was two William's resident in Binfield who might tie in, ie be the father. One being aged 10 the other 17, at the time of census, being sons of John [46] and William [40] who may well be brothers. I await certs. from record office to further investigation.
  2. [S1359] SOURCE: (Full):
    Source Combined Fields: Dowling.,
    Citation Detail: From: David Dowling [mailto:email address]Sent: 25 April 1999 21:16. To: email address: Dowling'sBrian, I see from various pages I have viewed on the internet that you have a wide record of Dowling's. I was wondering if you had any relating to Dowling's in Binfield Berks. I found a Pat Conroy who seemed to be on the case of these but found her E-mail to be unobtainable. This is what I have discovered at present, I have found that my grandfather Sydney William Dowling [dob 7/2/1897], his father William Clifford Dowling [dob 16/8/1863] and his father William Dowling [dob circa 1841 - I can not trace his birth registration which I understand was not compulsory until around 1860, but aged 40 at 1881 Census (Binfield)] were all born in Binfield. I am awaiting a copy of the 1851 Census to push on but any assistance you may able to give would be most appreciated. Best Regards.
  3. [S742] SOURCE: (Full): Ancestry.com,
    Source Combined Fields: 1911 census of England. Biggleswade, Bedfordshire. Digital images. Find My Past. https://search.findmypast.co.uk/record?id=GBC/1911/RG14/08889/0439&parentid=GBC/1911/RG14/08889/0439/1 : 2019.,
    Repository: www.ancestry.co.uk,
    Citation Detail: Class: RG14; Piece: 3102; Schedule Number: 244,
    Citation Text: Record for William Dowling
    Census-1911-ENG-Dowling-William-Clifford-01.jpg
    Census-1911-ENG-Dowling-William-Clifford-01.jpg
  4. [S961] SOURCE: (Full): Ancestry.com,
    Source Combined Fields: <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives, 1901. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU.,
    Repository: Ancestry.com,
    Citation Detail: Class: RG13; Piece: 1162; Folio: 38; Page: 27,
    Citation Text: Record for William Dowling
    Census-1901-ENG-Dowling-William-Clifford-01.jpg
    Census-1901-ENG-Dowling-William-Clifford-01.jpg

Peter Dowling

M, #1090, d. DECEASED

Parents

Pedigree Link

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Death: Peter Dowling died DECEASED.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: Peter Dowling had reference number 1090.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Re: Dowlings in England
Posted by Dave Dowling on December 27, 1998 at 14:20:42:

In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Alison Rosser on April 05, 1998 at 15:02:07:

Re Wok'ham area? My g/father was a Sydney Dowling born c1900,resided Horley, Surrey. Sons Peter/John. Tie in anywhere?

Re: Dowlings in England
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Posted by Dave Dowling on December 28, 1998 at 01:34:12:

In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Dave Dowling on December 27, 1998 at 14:20:42:

Corr. to earlier note. Place of domicile in
1920/30's was Hawley not Horley.

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Re: Dowlings in England
Posted by Dave Dowling on December 27, 1998 at 14:20:42:

In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Alison Rosser on April 05, 1998 at 15:02:07:

Re Wok'ham area? My g/father was a Sydney Dowling born c1900,resided Horley, Surrey. Sons Peter/John. Tie in anywhere?

Re: Dowlings in England
[ Follow Ups ] [ Post Followup ] [ Return to Message Listings ] [ Help ]

Posted by Dave Dowling on December 28, 1998 at 01:34:12:

In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Dave Dowling on December 27, 1998 at 14:20:42:

Corr. to earlier note. Place of domicile in
1920/30's was Hawley not Horley.

John Dowling

M, #1091, d. DECEASED

Parents

Pedigree Link

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Death: John Dowling died DECEASED.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: John Dowling had reference number 1091.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Re: Dowlings in England
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Posted by Dave Dowling on December 27, 1998 at 14:20:42:

In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Alison Rosser on April 05, 1998 at 15:02:07:

Re Wok'ham area? My g/father was a Sydney Dowling born c1900,resided Horley, Surrey. Sons Peter/John. Tie in anywhere?

Re: Dowlings in England
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Posted by Dave Dowling on December 28, 1998 at 01:34:12:

In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Dave Dowling on December 27, 1998 at 14:20:42:

Corr. to earlier note. Place of domicile in
1920/30's was Hawley not Horley.

James Dowling

M, #1093, b. before 1725, d. DECEASED
Pedigree Link

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Birth: James Dowling was born before 1725.
  • Marriage: He and Alice Jerome were married in 1741 in Chiseldon, Wiltshire, England.
  • Death: He died DECEASED.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: James Dowling had reference number 1093.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Posted by Alison Rosser on December 21, 1997 at 11:34:01:
E-mail: rrosser@onlink.net

In Reply to: research of the Dowling history posted by Don R. Dowling on December 17, 1997 at 22:43:46:

My Dowling/Doughling/Dowland connection begins in 1741 in Chiseldon, Wiltshire England.
James Dowling married Alice Jerome and raised a large family in the Wokingham area of Berkshire. It is possible that James was from Ireland, but not proven. Many of the descendents have been traced but there are many gaps - perhaps some crossed the Atlantic.
--------------------------------
Re: Dowlings in England
Posted by Alison Rosser on July 15, 1998 at 12:51:50:
In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Janet Mullany on July 12, 1998 at 23:33:32:

Hi Janet!
There is one branch of our Dowling family that still reside in Reading - but they descended from James Dowling and Alice Jerome(married in 1741)
My great grandfather moved from wokingham to Gomshall, Surrey and raised 11 children there. We also had a mini Dowling reunion in Abinger Hammer, Surrey 3 years ago when I was over visiting with my sister.
We were always told that great grandfather Henry Dowling was from Dun Laoghaire, Ireland so it was somewhat of a surprise to find him born in Wokingham! As was his father and his grandfather!! so much for family stories.....perhaps if we go far enough back the Irish link will be there!
How did you find the Irish link?

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Posted by Alison Rosser on December 21, 1997 at 11:34:01:
E-mail: rrosser@onlink.net

In Reply to: research of the Dowling history posted by Don R. Dowling on December 17, 1997 at 22:43:46:

My Dowling/Doughling/Dowland connection begins in 1741 in Chiseldon, Wiltshire England.
James Dowling married Alice Jerome and raised a large family in the Wokingham area of Berkshire. It is possible that James was from Ireland, but not proven. Many of the descendents have been traced but there are many gaps - perhaps some crossed the Atlantic.
--------------------------------
Re: Dowlings in England
Posted by Alison Rosser on July 15, 1998 at 12:51:50:
In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Janet Mullany on July 12, 1998 at 23:33:32:

Hi Janet!
There is one branch of our Dowling family that still reside in Reading - but they descended from James Dowling and Alice Jerome(married in 1741)
My great grandfather moved from wokingham to Gomshall, Surrey and raised 11 children there. We also had a mini Dowling reunion in Abinger Hammer, Surrey 3 years ago when I was over visiting with my sister.
We were always told that great grandfather Henry Dowling was from Dun Laoghaire, Ireland so it was somewhat of a surprise to find him born in Wokingham! As was his father and his grandfather!! so much for family stories.....perhaps if we go far enough back the Irish link will be there!
How did you find the Irish link?

Alice Jerome

F, #1094, d. DECEASED
Pedigree Link

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Marriage: Alice Jerome and James Dowling were married in 1741 in Chiseldon, Wiltshire, England.
  • Death: She died DECEASED.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: Alice Jerome had reference number 1094.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Posted by Alison Rosser on December 21, 1997 at 11:34:01:
E-mail: rrosser@onlink.net

In Reply to: research of the Dowling history posted by Don R. Dowling on December 17, 1997 at 22:43:46:

My Dowling/Doughling/Dowland connection begins in 1741 in Chiseldon, Wiltshire England.
James Dowling married Alice Jerome and raised a large family in the Wokingham area of Berkshire. It is possible that James was from Ireland, but not proven. Many of the descendents have been traced but there are many gaps - perhaps some crossed the Atlantic.
--------------------------------
Re: Dowlings in England
Posted by Alison Rosser on July 15, 1998 at 12:51:50:
In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Janet Mullany on July 12, 1998 at 23:33:32:

Hi Janet!
There is one branch of our Dowling family that still reside in Reading - but they descended from James Dowling and Alice Jerome(married in 1741)
My great grandfather moved from wokingham to Gomshall, Surrey and raised 11 children there. We also had a mini Dowling reunion in Abinger Hammer, Surrey 3 years ago when I was over visiting with my sister.
We were always told that great grandfather Henry Dowling was from Dun Laoghaire, Ireland so it was somewhat of a surprise to find him born in Wokingham! As was his father and his grandfather!! so much for family stories.....perhaps if we go far enough back the Irish link will be there!
How did you find the Irish link?

[Dowling_One_Name.FTW]

Posted by Alison Rosser on December 21, 1997 at 11:34:01:
E-mail: rrosser@onlink.net

In Reply to: research of the Dowling history posted by Don R. Dowling on December 17, 1997 at 22:43:46:

My Dowling/Doughling/Dowland connection begins in 1741 in Chiseldon, Wiltshire England.
James Dowling married Alice Jerome and raised a large family in the Wokingham area of Berkshire. It is possible that James was from Ireland, but not proven. Many of the descendents have been traced but there are many gaps - perhaps some crossed the Atlantic.
--------------------------------
Re: Dowlings in England
Posted by Alison Rosser on July 15, 1998 at 12:51:50:
In Reply to: Re: Dowlings in England posted by Janet Mullany on July 12, 1998 at 23:33:32:

Hi Janet!
There is one branch of our Dowling family that still reside in Reading - but they descended from James Dowling and Alice Jerome(married in 1741)
My great grandfather moved from wokingham to Gomshall, Surrey and raised 11 children there. We also had a mini Dowling reunion in Abinger Hammer, Surrey 3 years ago when I was over visiting with my sister.
We were always told that great grandfather Henry Dowling was from Dun Laoghaire, Ireland so it was somewhat of a surprise to find him born in Wokingham! As was his father and his grandfather!! so much for family stories.....perhaps if we go far enough back the Irish link will be there!
How did you find the Irish link?

Richard William Dowling

M, #1097, b. before 14 January 1837, d. 23 September 1867

Parents

Pedigree Link

Family

Family: Elizabeth Anne Odlum (b. 1840, d. 13 May 1918)





Person Exhibits

Portrait-Dowling-Dick-ConfederateP
Event-Sabine-Pass-1863-09-08-USA-Texas
Photo-Dowling-Dick-Confederate
Photo-Dowling-Richard-W-Lieut-Texas-rear
Photo-Dowling-Richard-W-Lieut-Texas-front
Portrait-Dowling-Richard-W-Lieut-Texas.jpg
Grave-Dowling-Richard-W-1837-1867
Grave-Dowling-Richard-W-1837-1867-002.jpg
Grave-Dowling-Richard-W-1837-1867-Houston.jpg
Photo-Dowling-Richard-William-Major-with-General-James-Longstreet-Unidentified-Veterans-Persons-Confederate-Army
Photo-Dowling.-Richard-William-1837-1867.jpg
Item-Dowling-Dick-1868-Sign-01
Item-Dowling-Dick-1868-Sign-02z
Memorial-Dowling-Dick-1837-1867-USA-TX-Houston-A

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Birth: Richard William Dowling was born before 14 January 1837 in Milltown, Galway, IrelandG, Knockballyvishteal; 'Knock'.1,2,3
  • Birth: He was born in 1848.4,5
  • Marriage: He and Elizabeth Anne Odlum were married on 30 November 1857 in Houston, Harris, Texas, USAG, St Vincent's Church.6
  • Death: He died on 23 September 1867 http://www.2020site.org/medals/davisguard.html; cause of death: Yellow Fever.4
  • Burial: He was buried after 23 September 1867 in Houston, Texas, USAG, St Vincent's Catholic Cemetery, Navigation Boulevard.

Other Facts

  • Name: Richard William Dowling was also known as Richard Dowling.7,2
  • Name: He was also known as R W Dowling.5,1
  • Name: He was also known as Richard W Dowling.4,8,6,9
  • Name: He was also known as Dick Dowling.10,7
  • Name: He was also known as Dick Dowling.
  • Occupation: He was a Lieutenant Texas Army (American Civil War.)
  • Military: Rank: Major.
  • Topic: Search references include: Military; American War of Independence; Confederate; Confederacy; War; conflict.
  • Military: Rank: Captain.
  • Reference Number: He had reference number 1097.
  • Immigration: He immigrated to New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USAG, in 1846 with sister Honora.
  • Residence: He resided in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USAG, between 1846 and 1857.
  • Census: He was enumerated on the census of 1850 in Orleans, Louisiana, USAG.3
  • Census: He was enumerated on the census of 1850 in Orleans, Louisiana, USAG.3
  • Residence: He resided in Houston, Texas, USAG, in 1857.
  • Fact: Noted on 8 September 1860 in Houston, Harris, Texas, USAG, Owned one male black slave aged 12.5
  • Occupation: He was a Pr [Proprietor] Barroom in Houston, Harris, Texas, USAG, on 18 October 1860.1
  • Census: He was enumerated on the census of 1860 in Houston, Harris, Texas, USAG.1
  • Residence: He resided in Houston, Harris, Texas, USAG, on 18 October 1860 [948] Ward 3.5
  • Timeline: He was alive at the time on 12 April 1861 when the American Civil War starts due to conflict between State and National authority over many issues, predominently, slavery in in USA.
  • Military: Battle of Sabine Pass.7,8
  • Military: Rank: Lieutenant.7
  • Military: Unit: Jefferson Davis Guards.7
  • Military: Service: Confederate States ARmy.7
  • Occupation: He was a Soldier (Confederacy) in 1863.
  • Timeline: He was alive at the time on 9 May 1865 when the American Civil War ends with dissolution of confederacy (South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana & Texas) in in USA.

Narrative

Wikipedia Entry 2019
Biography
Dowling was born in the townland of Knockballyvishteal, Milltown, County Galway, Ireland in January 1837, the second of eight children, born to tenant farmer Patrick and Bridget Dowling (née Qualter). Following eviction of his family from their home in 1845, the first year of the Great Famine, nine-year-old Dowling left Ireland with his older sister Honora, bound for New Orleans in the United States in 1846. As a teenager, young Dick Dowling displayed his entrepreneurial skills by successfully running the Continental Coffeehouse, a saloon in the fashionable French Quarter. His parents and siblings followed from Ireland in 1851, but the joy of reunion was short-lived. In 1853, a yellow fever outbreak in New Orleans took the lives of his parents and one of his younger brothers. With rising anti-Irish feeling growing in New Orleans, following local elections which saw a landslide victory for the 'Know Nothing' party, Dowling moved to Houston in 1857, where he leased the first of a number of saloons, a two-story building centrally located on the corner of Main and Prairie Streets. He named it the Shades, from the sycamore and cottonwood trees which lined the two streets and shaded the building. Advertised as 'inferior to none in the state' he opened a billiards saloon on the first floor. Dowling was described as a likable red-headed Irishman and wore a large moustache, possibly to make him appear older than he looked, as he was called 'The Kid' by family and friends alike at this time. In 1857 he married Elizabeth Ann Odlum, daughter of Benjamin Digby Odlum, a Kildare-born Irishman, who had fought in the Texas War of Independence, being captured at the Battle of Refugio in 1836. Following Texas Independence, he was elected subsequently to the fledgling Third Congress of the Republic of Texas.

Business and Civic interests
By 1860, Dowling owned a number of saloons. His most successful was named the Bank of Bacchus, located on Courthouse Square in downtown Houston. "The Bank" as it was known locally became Houston's most popular social gathering place in the 1860s and was renowned for its hospitality. Dowling's previous experience as a barkeeper in New Orleans stood him in good stead. Quickly establishing himself, Dowling courted publicity from local newspapers and also made a number of property investments. He was also involved in setting up Houston's first gaslight company, and was first to have it installed in his home and "The Bank". Dowling was a founding member of Houston's Hook and Ladder Company Number One fire department and was also involved in running the city's first streetcar company.

Civil War
Prior to the outbreak of the Civil War, Dowling had made a name for himself as an able and successful entrepreneur. Among other things, he had been involved with a predominantly Irish militia company which served a more social than military role in Houston society. On Secession, this militia company was mustered straight into the Confederate Army, with Dowling himself being elected First Lieutenant. Composed primarily of Houston Irish, many of them clients from his saloons, this unit named themselves the "Jefferson Davis Guards" in honor of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, who had been in Texas as a young officer in the pre-war Union Army and was remembered for his prowess and leadership skills. The Davis Guards were initially part of a Texas State Troops/Confederate expedition sent to take over Union Army forts and arsenals along the border with Mexico; the expedition was successfully completed without a shot being fired. They participated in the Battle of Galveston on New Year's Day 1863, following which they were assigned to a newly constructed artillery post near the mouth of Sabine River called "Fort Sabine" (later named "Fort Griffin", not the same as the later Fort Griffin established west of Fort Worth).

Sabine Pass was important as a point of arrival and departure for blockade runners. With the fall of Vicksburg in July 1863, followed by the Battle of Gettysburg, it was obvious that the Civil War was now not going well for the Confederacy, an invasion of Texas appeared to be imminent. It was suspected that the Union Army would attempt an invasion of Texas via Sabine Pass, because of its value as a harbor for blockade runners and because about 18 miles northwest was Beaumont, on the railroad between Houston and the eastern part of the Confederacy.

To negotiate Sabine Pass all vessels except small boats took one of the two river channels, both of about 5 feet (1.5 meters) depth and one on each side of the Pass. These channels were separated by naturally formed "oyster-banks" known to be barely two feet (0.60 meter) under the surface. No seagoing ship could traverse the Pass without great risk of going aground, if it did not follow one of the channels. The inevitable course of any steam-powered warship-including shallow-draft gunboats then common to the U.S. Navy-would necessarily use one of the channels, both of which were within fair range of the fort's six smoothbores.

Dowling spent the summer of 1863 at the earthen fort instructing his men in gunnery. To mark the optimum distance and elevation for each of the guns, he implemented the technique of setting long slender poles (painted white, in this instance) in both channels at several places. This was an old method for guiding boats and, especially since the advent of firearms, to mark an aiming points for guns.

On September 8, 1863 a Union Navy flotilla of some 22 gunboats and transports with 5,000 men accompanied by cavalry and artillery arrived off the mouth of Sabine Pass. The plan of invasion was sound, but monumentally mismanaged. Four of the flanking gunboats were to steam up the pass at speed and draw the fire of the fort, two in each channel, a tactic which had been used successfully in subduing the defensive fortifications of Mobile and New Orleans prior to this, when gunboats disabled the forts at close range with their own guns. This time, though, Dowling's artillery drills paid off as the Confederates poured a rapid and withering fire onto the incoming gunboats, scoring several direct hits, disabling and capturing two, while the others retreated in disarray. The rest of the flotilla retreated from the mouth of the pass and returned ignominiously to New Orleans, leaving the disabled ships with no option but to surrender to Dowling. With a command of just 47 men, Lieut. Dowling had thwarted an attempted invasion of Texas, in the process capturing two gunboats, some 350 prisoners and a large quantity of supplies and munitions.

The Confederate government offered its gratitude and admiration to Dowling, now promoted to Major, and his unit, as a result of their battlefield prowess. In gratitude, the ladies of Houston presented the unit with specially struck medals. The medals were actually Mexican eight reale coins with both faces sanded down and with new information carved into them. They were inscribed "Sabine Pass, 1864" on one side, and had a Maltese Cross with the letters D and G on the other. Because of the official recognition given to the action, it is now accepted that these Davis Guard Medals are the only medals of honor issued by the Confederate government, and consequently are collector's items today.

After the war and death

After the battle of Sabine Pass Dowling was elevated to hero status in his hometown of Houston. He subsequently served as a recruiter for the Confederacy and was personally commended for his action at the battle by Jefferson Davis. After the war Dowling returned to his saloon business in Houston and quickly became one of the city's leading businessmen. Dowling's promising future was cut short by another yellow fever epidemic which devastated Houston in the late summer of 1867, and he died on September 23, 1867. He was buried at St. Vincent's Catholic Cemetery, the oldest Catholic cemetery in Houston.

Memorials and monuments
In 1905, by public demand, the city of Houston commissioned a statue of Dick Dowling, and it stood outside City Hall until 1939 when it was moved to Sam Houston Park. When the city hall was moved to a newer building in 1958 the statue was relocated to Hermann Park, near the monument to Sam Houston, where it remains today. Dowling's statue has appeared numerous times in local newspapers as his sword was repeatedly stolen by pranksters. On the night of August 19, 2017 a man was caught by a security guard attempting to blow up Dowling's statue, stating that he "didn't like that guy." In 1997, the Dick Dowling Society completed restoration on Dowling's statue. Annually, usually on the Saturday closest to St. Patrick's Day, the Dick Dowling Irish Heritage Society holds a commemoration ceremony at the statue. This event is regularly attended by a number of the descendants of Dick's sisters. Dick and Elizabeth had two children that survived to adulthood, Mary Anne Dowling and Felix "Richard" Sabine Dowling.

In Houston, Dowling's legacy is remembered in the naming of Dowling Middle School, a middle school that serves the city's predominantly African-American and Hispanic south side. Dowling Street, a major artery of the city's predominantly African-American Third Ward, had also been named after him. However, on January 11, 2017, Houston City Council approved a plan to rename Dowling Street to Emancipation Avenue.[12] Tuam Street, another major artery named for Tuam, is also named in Dowling's honor by recognizing his place of birth in Ireland. There are similarly named streets in towns and cities across east Texas, notably Port Arthur and Beaumont, as well as memorials to Dowling and the Davis Guards, not least at Sabine Pass, where the battleground is now preserved as a state park where the battle is re-enacted every September.

In 1998, the town of Tuam also placed a bronze memorial plaque of Dowling on its Town Hall facade bearing his image and explaining his feats. This is the first known memorial to an Irish-born Confederate soldier in Ireland.

In August 2017 the Tuam Municipal Council scheduled a hearing for September 11 to debate the removal of the plaque. It was reported on the CNN website that local citizens had questioned the appropriateness of having a Confederate memorial on the town hall. In September 2017 Tuam Town Councillors rejected the proposal to remove the plaque. One councillor stated that "We all felt that it was not a top priority for the town. There are more important things going on."

-----------------------
'The Civil War, Strange and Fascinating Facts' by Burke Davis:- "Capt. Richard W. Dowling, age 19 of the Davis Guards, with 43 men armed with rifles and six small cannon, defended Sabine Pass, Texas in Sept. 1863. They drove off a Federal Fleet of some 1,500 men which tried to land. He and his men sank one gunboat, disabled and captured two others, and turned away the rest of the fleet. He took four hundred prisoners, without the loss of a single man. This was the only command of record in the war to get it's entire muster roll into official reports. All the men serving with him recieved silver medals from Jefferson Davis, the only such reward given by the Confederacy."
-
"DOWLING, RICHARD WILLIAM." The Handbook of Texas Online. [Accessed Tue Oct 24 15:46:36 US/Central 2000 ].

DOWLING, RICHARD WILLIAM (1838-1867). Richard William Dowling, businessman and Civil War hero, son of William and Mary Dowling, was born in Tuam, Galway County, Ireland, in 1838. After 1846 the family migrated to the United States and settled in New Orleans. In the early 1850s, after the deaths of his parents, Dick Dowling worked his way to Texas and eventually settled in Houston.

The likeable, red-headed Irishman quickly made a reputation as an enterprising businessman. In October 1857 he opened the Shades, the first of his successful saloons. He probably received financial backing for this enterprise from Benjamin Digby Odlum,qv whose daughter, Elizabeth Ann, Dowling married in November 1857. By 1860 he had sold his interest in the Shades and had purchased the popular Bank of Bacchus near the Harris County Courthouse. Still later he operated the Hudgpeth Bathing Saloon as well as a Galveston-based liquor-importing firm.

With the outbreak of the Civil Warqv Dowling joined the Jefferson Davisqv Guards as first lieutenant. Capt. Frederick H. Odlum was commander. During the first part of 1861 Dowling and his associates raided United States Army outposts on the Texas-Mexico border. When the guards were designated Company F of the Third Texas Artillery Battalion in October 1861, Dowling's theater became the upper Texas Gulf Coast. By 1862 the battalion was upgraded to a full regiment, the First Texas Heavy Artillery, under the overall command of Col. J. J. Cook.

Dowling's early Civil War exploits were consistent but not spectacular. On January 1, 1863, he participated in Gen. John B. Magruder'sqv recapture of the port of Galveston (see GALVESTON, BATTLE OF). Three weeks later, after the transfer of his company to Sabine Pass, which controlled access to the Sabine River, he earned his first individual praise. As artillery commander aboard the steamer Josiah A. Bell, he took part in a naval battle on January 21, 1863, with two United States vessels. In a two-hour engagement the Confederate forces achieved a victory, in part because of Dowling's accuracy with the eight-inch Columbiad gun, which he commanded. Not only was he singled out for making some of the "prettiest shots" but also for saving the Bell's magazine from flooding.

Throughout the spring and summer of 1863 Odlum, Dowling, and the guards manned defensive positions at Sabine Pass, including Fort Griffin, a nondescript post on the west side of the pass that controlled both the Texas and Louisiana channels of the river. By August 1863 Odlum was in charge of forces at nearby Sabine City, and Dowling commanded Company F, which consisted of forty-seven men armed with six cannons, at Fort Griffin. On September 8, 1863, the United States forces attacked the area in what became known as the battle of Sabine Pass.qv Dowling directed such intense and accurate fire from his guns that two of the United States gunboats, the Clifton and the Sachem,qqv were disabled, and the remaining United States vessels withdrew. As a result of federal ineptitude and Dowling's leadership, Dowling and his men captured two ships and 350 prisoners and routed the invasion without a single casualty.

The battle at Sabine Pass was the pinnacle of Dowling's career. During the remainder of the war he was a recruiting officer for the Confederacy, until his discharge with the rank of major in 1865. He returned to Houston, managed the businesses he had owned before the war, and acquired new businesses, including real estate, oil and gas leases, and an interest in a steamboat. His financial successes appeared to ensure a bright future, but he became ill with yellow fever and died on September 23, 1867. He was survived by his wife, a daughter, and a son and was buried in St. Vincent's Cemetery, Houston.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Alwyn Barr, "Sabine Pass, September 1863," Texas Military History 2 (February 1962). Seymour V. Connor et al., Battles of Texas (Waco: Texian Press, 1967; 3d ed. 1980). Andrew Forest Muir, "Dick Dowling and the Battle of Sabine Pass," Civil War History 4 (December 1958). Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies (Washington: Department of the Navy, 1894-1927). Frank X. Tolbert, Dick Dowling at Sabine Pass (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1962). James R. Ward, "Richard W. `Dick' Dowling," in Ten Texans in Gray, ed. W. C. Nunn (Hillsboro, Texas: Hill Junior College Press, 1968).

James R. Ward

eBay sale October 2015 - "A rare CDV image here of 1st Lieutenant Richard W Dowling of the Texas 1st Heavy Artillery. This image was in with all of the the other Massachusetts images I have listed. Apparently the 7th Massachusetts was in Texas and must have had some connection with Dowling I assume."

Dowlings and the Civil War
Posted by Michael Dowling on January 07, 1999 at 21:33:40:

I am searching for any and all helpful information about dowlings in the Civil War.
I am extremely interested in info on Lt. Richard(Dick) Dowling of the Davis Guards in TX.
---===oOo===---
Houston Life 23 Jun 2020: https://www.click2houston.com/news/local/2020/06/17/dick-dowling-statue-to-be-removed-wednesday-afternoon-sources-say/
Dick Dowling statue removed from Hermann Park ahead of Juneteenth celebrations
HOUSTON - The statue of a Confederate commander that has stood in Houston for more than a century was removed from it’s place in Hermann Park on Wednesday afternoon.
The monument to Robert “Dick” Dowling was erected in 1905 and is located at the Cambridge Street entrance to the park. It was the first publicly funded monument in the city.

Dowling gained notoriety for his role in recapturing Galveston and defeating a Union invasion force during the Battle of Sabine Pass in 1863. Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner said he wants to relocate the Dowling statue to the Sabine Pass Battleground State Historic Site in Port Arthur, Texas. That plan was placed in limbo, however, after the Texas Historical Commission delayed Friday’s vote on accepting the statue at the site.
A statue called the “Spirit of the Confederacy” was removed from Sam Houston Park late Tuesday night.
Turner has said that statue will eventually be moved to the Houston Museum of African-American Culture, where it will be viewed as a historical artifact and seen in the appropriate context. Not everyone is happy with that plan, though.
Turner has said both statues will go into storage until a better place can be found to display them in the appropriate context.

Turner pledged to remove both statues before June 19, which is also known as Juneteenth. It marks the date in 1865 when word of the Emancipation Proclamation was received in Galveston.
Several people gathered Wednesday to watch as the statue was taken down. Many of them saying it’s a part of history they’d rather not see so prominently displayed.
“I’m just observing a dark part of our history being removed from the city of Houston,” said Derek Blaylock.
“I just think it does reflect our current morality, people just rejecting racism,” said Houston resident Donald Hayes. “These were put up as insults to black people.”
“What’s happening now is probably the right thing for it,” said Houston historian Mister McKinney. “It is a part of Houston history, but like I said he was put up for a reason and for that reason alone and should be taken down.”
Copyright 2020 by KPRC Click2Houston - All rights reserved.
.---===oOo===---.

Citations

  1. [S987] SOURCE: (Full): Ancestry.com,
    Source Combined Fields: 1860 census of United States of America. Digital images. Find My Past. www.findmypast.co.uk : see citation.

    1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.,
    Citation Detail: Database online. Houston Ward 3, Harris, Texas, post office Houston, roll M653_1296, page 412, image 265.,
    Citation Text: Record for R W Dowling
    Census-1860-USA-Dowling-R-W-01.jpg
    Census-1860-USA-Dowling-R-W-01.jpg
  2. [S2265] SOURCE: (Full):
    Source Combined Fields: Roman Catholic Church (Ireland, Galway, Tuam, DUNMORE). Ireland Roman Catholic Parish BAPTISMS. Digital images. Find My Past. www.findmypast.co.uk : 2019.

    Repository: National Library of Ireland; National Library of Ireland register: http://registers.nli.ie//registers/vtls000632037#page/1/mode/1up; Register: Baptism; Record set: Ireland Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms; Category: Birth, Marriage, Death & Parish Records; Subcategory: Parish Baptisms; Collections from: Ireland

    Repository: National Library of Ireland; National Library of Ireland register: http://registers.nli.ie//registers/vtls000632081#page/1/mode/1up; Register: Baptism; Record set: Ireland Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms; Category: Birth, Marriage, Death & Parish Records; Subcategory: Parish Baptisms; Collections from: Ireland,
    Citation Detail: Record for RICHARD DOWLING,
    Citation Text: First name(s): Richard; Last name: Dowling; Birth year: -; Baptism year: 1837; Baptism date: 14 Jan 1837; Parish: Dunmore; Diocese: Tuam; County: Galway; Country: Ireland; Father's first name(s): Pat
    ; Father's last name: Dowling; Mother's first name(s): Briget; Mother's last name: Qualter;
    Birth-Dowling-Richard-1837-01-14-IRL-Galway-Dunmore-Baptism
    Birth-Dowling-Richard-1837-01-14-IRL-Galway-Dunmore-Baptism
  3. [S2271] SOURCE: (Full):
    Source Combined Fields: 1850 census of United States of America, Louisiana. ORLEANS. Digital images. Find My Past. https://search.findmypast.co.uk/record?id=USC%2F1850%2F004198711%2F00033&parentid=USC%2F1850%2F004198711%2F00033%2F031 : 2019.

    NARA series: 443481; Record set: Us Census 1850; Category: Census, land & surveys; Subcategory: Census; Collections from: Americas, United States,
    Citation Detail: Record for RICHD DOWLING,
    Citation Text: Gender: Male; Age: 13; Birth year: 1837; Birth place: Ireland; Dwelling: 258; City/township: New Orleans, ward 1 (3rd municipality); County: Orleans; State: Louisiana
    Census-1850-USA-Dowling-Richd-1837-Louisiana-Orleans
    Census-1850-USA-Dowling-Richd-1837-Louisiana-Orleans
  4. [S427] SOURCE: (Full): Ancestry.com,
    Source Combined Fields: Gale Research Company, Biography and Genealogy Master Index, Detroit, MI, USA: Gale Research Company, 2005,
    Repository: www.ancestry.co.uk,
    Citation Detail: Database online.,
    Citation Text: Record for Richard W Dowling
  5. [S988] SOURCE: (Full): Ancestry.com,
    Source Combined Fields: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. ;Eighth Census of the United States, 1860</i>. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1,438 rolls.,
    Repository: Ancestry.com,
    Citation Detail: Database online.,
    Citation Text: Record for R W Dowling
    Census-1860-USA-Dowling-R-W-01-Slave.jpg
    Census-1860-USA-Dowling-R-W-01-Slave.jpg
  6. [S989] SOURCE: (Full): Ancestry.com,
    Source Combined Fields: <p>Dodd, Jordan R, et. al. ;Early American Marriages: Texas to 1850</i>. Bountiful, UT: Precision Indexing Publishers, 19xx.

    ;<p>Hunting For Bears, comp. Texas marriage information taken from county courthouse records. Many of these records were extracted from copies of the original records in microfilm, microfiche, or book format, located at the Family History Library.

    ;<p>Texas Department of State Health Services. Texas Marriage Index, 1966-2011. Texas Department of State Health Services, Texas.

    ;<p>Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp. (P.O. Box 740, Orem, Utah 84059) from county marriage records on microfilm located at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, in published books cataloged by the Library of Congress, or from county courthouse records.

    ;
    Repository: Ancestry.com,
    Citation Detail: Database online.,
    Citation Text: Record for Elizabeth Anne Odlum
  7. [S2258] SOURCE: (Full):
    Source Combined Fields: Dowling. Privately held by Bill W Smith, USA.,
    Citation Detail: #1) - 17Jun2000; #2) - 26Jun2000,
    Citation Text: -----------------------------------Original Message----------------------------- From: Bill W Smith Jr [mailto:email address]; Sent: 17 June 2000 04:47; To: email address; Subject: Dowling family
    Greetings! I am tracing my tree and so I have found you. I am a descendant of Josephine Dowling, younger sister of Richard "Dick" Dowling. Dick was a lieutenant in the Texas Army during the American Civil War and won fame and honor at the Battle of Sabine Pass. There is a statue in his honour here in Houston. I am seeking information prior to he and his sister. My own modest FTM efforts (I just got started) are at http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/s/m/i/Bill-W-Smith-jr/index.html. Thank you for your help.
    Bill W Smith Jr mailto:email address; ServPlex, Inc. - Software for the Distribution Industry; Vice President, Product Development; http://www.servplex.com ICQ:425524 (832) 372-3527 mobile; (281) 376-5377 Houston (281) 376-8567 fax (425) 988-8077 eFax; (972) 263-2080 Dallas (972) 263-2082 fax

    ----------------------Original Message------------------------------------------ From: Bill W Smith Jr [mailto:email address]; Sent: 26 June 2000 23:11; To: Brian Dowling; Subject: RE: Dowling family
    Well, I got quite a bit downstream from them from my mother. For Josephine's 16th birthday Dick gave her a cut glass nicknack holder in the shape of a top hat. It has been handed down through the female line since.
    My mother has it and will eventually give it to my "little" brother's daughter, Ashley Catriona, unless one of my boys has a girl while mom is still with us. The hat has in it a newspaper clipping about the Dick Dowling statue and an index card with the names of the women who have owned it. If you go to my page and pull up my InterneTree, walk from my mother back to her father and then his mother.
    This coming weekend I will be getting a whole bunch of documents from my mother that she got from the Dick Dowling Society here in Houston. I will gladly send you a .GED or .fbc file when I have added it all to my tree.
  8. [S2259] SOURCE: (Full):
    Source Combined Fields: GenForum, discussion list, 1999. https://www.genealogy.com/forum/ : 1999.,
    Citation Text: ------------------Genforum Posting-------------------------- Capt. Richard W. Dowling; Posted by Dana Crawford-Pulley on August 16, 1999 at 00:25:31:; E-mail: email address
    I came across this passage some time ago in a book titled 'The Civil War, Strange and Fascinating Facts' by Burke Davis. Hope this is of use to someone.
    Capt. Richard W. Dowling, age 19 of the Davis Guards, with 43 men armed with rifles and six small cannon, defended Sabine Pass, Texas in Sept. 1863. They drove off a Federal Fleet of some 1,500 men which tried to land. He and his men sank one gunboat, disabled and captured two others, and turned away the rest of the fleet. He took four hundred prisoners, without the loss of a single man. This was the only command of record in the war to get it's entire muster roll into official reports. All the men serving with him recieved silver medals from Jefferson Davis, the only such reward given by the Confederacy. Although I am not directly descended from this gentleman, I would like to hear from anyone who is. Thanx, Dana.
  9. [S2272] SOURCE: (Full):
    Source Combined Fields: Texas, USA. Harris. Harris. "United States Marriages Transcriptions".

    FamilySearch film number: 000025222; Record set: United States Marriages; Category: Birth, Marriage, Death & Parish Records; Subcategory: Civil Marriage & Divorce; Collections from: Americas, United States,
    Repository: Find My Past,
    Citation Detail: Record for RICHARD W DOWLING to ELIZABETH ANNE ODLUM,
    Citation Text: Event: Marriage; Year: 1857; Event date: 30 Nov 1857; Location: -; Place: Harris, Texas, United States; County: Harris; State: Texas; Country: United States; Spouse's first name(s):Spouse's sex: Female
    Marriage-Dowling-Richard-W-Odlum-Elizabeth-Anne-1857-11-30-USA-Texas-Harris
  10. [S2257] SOURCE: (Full):
    Source Combined Fields: Dowling, Michael, -. "Dowlings and the Civil War". -. -, 7Jan1999. - : 1999.,
    Citation Detail: Posted by Michael Dowling on January 07, 1999 at 21:33:40: I am searching for any and all helpful information about dowlings in the Civil War. I am extremely interested in info on Lt. Richard(Dick) Dowling of the Davis Guards in TX.

Levi H Dowling

M, #1098, b. 18 May 1844, d. 13 August 1911

Parents

Pedigree Link

Family

Family: Sylvia Ann Demmon (b. 16 March 1844, d. 30 August 1865)





Person Exhibits

Portrait-Dowling-Levi-H-1944C
Photo-Dowling-Levi-H-1944-02
Photo-Dowling-Levi-H-1944-01
Book-Dowling-Levi-Aquarian-Gospel

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Birth: Levi H Dowling was born on 18 May 1844 in Bellville, Richland, Ohio, USAG, in log cabin.
  • Marriage: He and Sylvia Ann Demmon were married on 12 November 1863 in Allen, Noble, Indiana, USA.
  • Death: He died on 13 August 1911, at age 67.

Other Facts

  • Name: Levi H Dowling was also known as Lee Dowling.
  • Military: Captain (Union) Army.
  • Residence: He resided in Kendallville, Noble, Indiana, USAG.
  • Reference Number: He had reference number 1098.
  • Military: Garrison duty.
  • Military: Union Army Divisional Chaplain and opographical Engineer (Civil War) serving on General Thomas Wilberforce Egan staff in 3rd Provisional Division. Preached to Union troops in Illionois at memorial service in honor of President Abraham Lincoln.
  • Title: He held the title Lt.
  • Residence: He resided in Mount Gilead, Morrow, Ohio, USAG.
  • Fact: Noted in 1857 First public debate taking a negative side against a Presbyterian Elder on 'The Everlasting Punishment of the Wicked'.
  • Occupation: He was a Began preaching in 1860.
  • Military: Company S of the 152nd Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment (See uniform in photo.)
  • Occupation: He was a Pastor of small church in 1862.
  • Military: Joined Union Army as Chaplain.
  • Military: Musterede to Company S of the 152nd Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment (See uniform in photo.)
  • Occupation: He was a Student at Northwestern Christian University (now Butler University) between 1866 and 1867.
  • Fact: Noted in 1867 in Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana, USAG, Published 'The Morning Watch' for Sunday School, Family and Church.
  • Fact: Noted in 1908 Published The Aquarian Gospel of Jesus The Christ.
  • Military:

Narrative

Ebay sale of photographs 8Dec2012: Bought by Brian Thomas Dowling, St Albans, United Kingdom:

Levi H. Dowling (May 18, 1844 - August 13, 1911) was an American preacher. He was born in Bellville, Ohio. His father, of Scots and Welsh descent, was a pioneer preacher among the Disciples of Christ. At the age of thirteen, in his first public debate, he took the negative side against a Presbyterian Elder on "The Everlasting Punishment of the Wicked."

Levi began preaching at the age of sixteen; and at the age of eighteen was pastor of a small church. He entered the United States Army at the age of twenty, as a chaplain, and served in this capacity to the end of the Civil War.

Levi H. Dowling was born in a log cabin in Bellville, Richland County, Ohio, on the morning of May 18, 1844, the son of William Dowling and Rachel (Biggs) Dowling. Levi’sfamily and friends often called him “Lee,” and he generally referred to himself that way. His father was an enthusiastic early minister of the Church of Christ, the movement founded by Alexander Campbell that was meant to be a restitution of the original, ancient Christian church before it was fragmented into sects. William Dowling was an eager minister of that vision. He ministered to congregations of the Church of Christ in Mansfield (a few miles north of Bellville), in Ashland, and in West Point, Ohio.

During Levi’s early years, his family lived in Mt. Gilead, and then near the town of Kendallville, Indiana. The 1860 Federal Census shows young Levi, age fourteen, living on a farm with his parents and some of his sisters. Living on adjacent farms were Levi’s older brothers William Worth Dowling and John Biggers Dowling, who were already married and were raising families. Levi attended school in Kendallville, where his older brother William taught for two years.

At the age of eighteen, Levi briefly became pastor of a small church. In a ceremony presided over by evangelist and preacher William T. Horner, Levi married a neighbor, Sylvia Ann Demmon, in the town of Allen, just south of Kendallville, on November 12, 1863. She had been born March 16, 1844, one of her parents’ nine children. Her father was Leonard Demmon; her mother was Nancy (Boughey) Demmon. Levi and Sylvia soon had a baby, named Frankie.

Toward the end of the Civil War, children still living in Kendallville, young Levi “assisted in recruiting a company of volunteers,” and enlisted in Company S of the 152nd Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment. He was mustered in on March 16, 1865. His brother William wrote that, “Like the sons of most pioneer preachers of that day, he expected to devote his life to the ministry, and had ‘exercised’ his gifts’ on numerous occasions. As a consequence of his ability as a speaker soon after reaching the field, he was appointed a chaplain, and was perhaps one of the youngest men who ever held such a position.” His Chaplain’s commission was that of Captain. Levi H. Dowling.

The Regiment left Indiana for Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia,where it was assigned garrison duty, and was posted in Clarksburg, West Virginia for the few months until the end of the War. The Regiment lost no personnel from combat, but forty-nine by disease-a smallpox epidemic had spread through the region. A few days before Levi was mustered out, his wife Sylvia brought their young infant, son Frankie, to visit him in Clarksburg. “Both took sick,” Levi later wrote.

The child died on August 27th, and Sylvia died on the day he was mustered out, August 30, 1865. Levi took both bodies home with him. He buried them in Kendallville.

Later that year he went to Indianapolis and there enrolled as a student at Northwestern Christian University (now Butler University) during the academic year of 1866-67. During this time, his brother, William, also a Church of Christ preacher, was teaching at the University and was actively building up the Second Christian Church in Indianapolis, a mission of the First Church to African-Americans in the city. William was also helping preach at the Fourth Christian Church there, in its mission Sabbath School. Levi began helping him publish Sunday School literature, lesson plans and songbooks, and a children’s religious newspaper.
Levi and William together published a weekly newspaper, The Morning Watch, issued in Indianapolis, beginning in 1867, “for the Sunday School, Family and Church.” Levi also published a hymn collection, The Palm of Victory, especially for Sunday Schools. William would continue to publish such material for the next three decades.-
The next year he began publishing Sunday School literature, issuing Sunday School Lesson Papers, Song Books, and a Children's Sunday School Paper. Dowling preached President Lincoln's funeral service to Union troops in Illinois. He was the author of two spiritual healing books Self-Culture and Biopneuma: The Science of the Great Breath. The Publisher's Introduction to Biopneuma says that Levi taught chemistry, toxicology, physiology, histology, and lectured on the use of electricity in medicine.

In order to conduct the religious publishing business, Levi moved from Indianapolis in 1868, to Chicago, where he lived until 1871, then briefly to Bloomington, Indiana, and then on to St. Louis, where his brother headquartered their business. Also, on June 16, 1868, while living in Chicago, Levi married again, to Kate S. Mayo, in that city. William wrote of Levi that during this time he traveled extensively organizing schools, introducing the then new International Lesson system; holding institutes and conventions; forming teacher classes and, in fact, “blazing the way” and formulating the plans which Sunday-school evangelists have been largely following ever since.
Levi and his brother made a business of setting up Sunday
Schools, by preaching at a church and encouraging the establishment there of a Sunday School for adults and for children. They then trained the teachers, demonstrated model classes for different aged pupils, and provided standardized lesson plans, hymnals, and teaching materials.
William and Levi also published a series of children’s Sunday School newspapers from Indianapolis and Chicago.
Much of his time was devoted to the cause of Prohibition. He was a graduate of two medical colleges, and practiced medicine for a number of years. He finally retired from the medical profession to resume literary work.

Even as a child, he was impressed with the sensitiveness of the finer ethers, and believed that in some manner they were sensitized plates on which sounds, even thoughts, were recorded. With avidity he entered into the deeper studies of etheric vibration, determined to solve the great mysteries of the heavens for himself. Forty years he spent in study and silent meditation, and allegedly eventually he found himself in that stage of spiritual consciousness that permitted him to enter the domain of these superfine ethers, and become familiar with their mysteries. During the meditation, it was claimed that he was able to repeat events, as many times as necessary, in order to provide us with a perfect transcript. He spent many months transcribing the events he supposedly witnessed - in “The Book of God’s Remembrance” also known as The Akashic Records. His transcription is commonly known as “The Aquarian Gospel.” He allegedly learned that the imaginings of his boyhood days were founded upon veritable facts, and that every thought of every living thing is there recorded. He claimed that as a boy, he also had a vision in which he was told that he was to "build a white city." and this vision was repeated three times with years intervening. The building of the "white city" was The Aquarian Gospel of Jesus the Christ.

The Aquarian Gospel of Jesus the Christ

Dowling wrote The Aquarian Gospel of Jesus the Christ (full title: The Aquarian Age Gospel of Jesus, the Christ of the Piscean Age) in the late 19th century and published it in 1908. He claimed it was the true story of the life of Jesus, including “the ‘lost’ eighteen years silent in the New Testament.” Dowling claimed to have transcribed it from the Akashic Records. He transcribed the book in the early morning hours from two to six - the absolutely "quiet hours".

The Aquarian Age denotes the human race as standing on the cusp of the Piscean-Aquarian Ages. Aquarius is an air sign and the New Age is already noted for remarkable inventions for the use of air, electricity, magnetism, etc. Men navigate the air as fish do the sea, and send their thoughts spinning around the world with the speed of lightning. The word Aquarius is derived from the Latin word aqua, meaning water. Aquarius is, however, the water bearer, and the symbol of the sign, which is the, eleventh sign of the Zodiac, is a man carrying in his right hand a pitcher of water.

Legacy

The Aquarian Christine Church Universal, Inc. (ACCU) is a denomination founded on the teachings found in The Aquarian Gospel and other writings by Levi H. Dowling. These include Self-culture and Biopneuma: The Science of the Holy Breath. The church also incorporates other New Age teachings. It is similar to the "I AM Movement" and the Ascended Master Teachings.

Through exhaustive archival research, ACCU founder, Rev. Dr. J. L. Watson discovered that in a letter to Levi Dowling's brother-in-law, Isaac Newton Demmon (1842-1920), he relates his being appointed divisional chaplain and topographical engineer serving on Thomas Wilberforce Egan's staff in the 3rd Provisional Division and him giving a eulogy to Union troops in Illinois at a memorial service in honor of President Abraham Lincoln. No prior biographer of Levi Dowling had ever mentioned this fact.

In a biographical sketch included in the original publication of "Self-culture," Levi is said to have taught and lectured medical students in the use of electricity in medicine, and thus had an early influence on modern medicine. The Aquarian Christian Church considers Dowling an Ascended Master.

The book The Aquarian Gospel of Jesus The Christ by Levi is considered a visionary text professing to tell the complete story of Jesus' life, including the "lost" years, during which he traveled and studied in Tibet, Egypt, India, Persia, and Greece. First published in 1908, this mystical work is the cornerstone of a Christian denomination and offers intriguing, controversial assertions about Christ's message.

Levi H. Dowing died August 13, 1911 in Los Angeles, California.

Thomas Wilberforce Egan (1836-February 24, 1887) was a Union Army officer who led the Mozart Regiment during most of the American Civil War, later becoming a general.

Early life

Egan was born in New York City of Irish immigrant parents in 1836. Little is known about his life before the Civil War. He is believed to have married an Actor and fathered a child who died young.

Military career

Egan joined the 40th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, called the Mozart Regiment, in April 1861 at the beginning of the Civil War, as a private. (The regiment was sponsored by the Democratic Party's Mozart Hall Committee.) Egan was made lieutenant colonel on June 14, 1861.
Lieutenant Colonel Egan participated in most of the major battles of the Army of the Potomac. Initially, the Mozart Regiment served in first division III Corps. Col. Egan is reported to have arrested the colonel of the regiment for misconduct at the Battle of Fair Oaks in May 1862. In June 1862, Egan was promoted to the rank of colonel. He led the regiment at the Second Battle of Bull Run, the Battle of Chantilly and the Battle of Chancellorsville. At Chancellorsville, Colonel Egan became acting commander of first brigade first division III Corps, when Brigadier General Charles K. Graham was assigned to command of the third division following the death of Major General Amiel W. Whipple. At the Battle of Gettysburg on July 2, 1863, Colonel Egan, once more leading his regiment, was wounded in action near Devil's Den, being hit in a leg; and the regiment’s monument stands near that site. The Mozart Regiment lost 150 of 431 troops engaged. Egan also led the Mozart Regiment in the Mine Run Campaign during the autumn of 1863.

Just before Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant's Overland Campaign of 1864, III Corps was dissolved. First division became third division II Corps. Egan led his regiment in the Battle of the Wilderness. He became commander of a brigade during the Battle of Spotsylvania, after Brigadier General J. H. Hobart Ward was relieved for drunkenness on the night of May 12, 1864. His command was involved in a counterattack against the Confederates during the fighting at Harris Farm. Egan led the brigade at the Battle of North Anna, attacking Henagan's Redoubt. He also led it at the Battle of Cold Harbor. Egan was wounded during the Second Battle of Petersburg in June 1864, suffering slight paralysis as a result.

Colonel Egan received his commission as brigadier general on September 3, 1864. (Secretary of War Edwin Stanton personally handed him his commission.) At the Battle of Boydton Plank Road on October 27, he commanded the second division II Corps in place of Brigadier General John Gibbon. Egan was seriously wounded on November 14, 1864. The wound disabled his right arm. On recovering, he was given a division in the Army of the Shenandoah on the request of Major General Winfield Scott Hancock. On December 12, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln nominated Egan for appointment to the brevet grade of major general of volunteers to rank from October 27, 1864 for his service at the Battle of Boydton Plank Road, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the nomination on February 14, 1865.

Later life
General Egan was mustered out of the service, January 15, 1866, and subsequently lived in New York City. He served as deputy collector of customs for the port of New York. He also belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic. Brigadier General Egan died in New York City on February 24, 1887. According to the New York Times, General Egan was struck down by epilepsy while staying at the International Hotel in New York City. He was taken to the Chambers Street Hospital, a charity hospital, where he died.

David Dowling

M, #1099, b. 1836, d. after 1851

Parents

Pedigree Link

BIOGRAPHY

Vital Facts

  • Birth: David Dowling was born in 1836 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
  • Death: He died after 1851.

Other Facts

  • Reference Number: David Dowling had reference number 1099.

Narrative

[Dowling One Name Master.FTW]

David DOWLING, 1836, BRK, Eng
Posted by Alison Rosser on January 10, 1999 at 13:20:29:
E-mail: rrosser@onlink.net
I have lost David DOWLING born 1836 in Wokingham,Berks., England (parents David and Sarah)
Last seen in 1851 census, living in Wokingham, Berks with his family.
Anyone seen him?